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THE MUSEUM SHIP NORGOMA

Welcome to the Norgoma's site, enjoy your stay!

SERVICES on THE NORGOMA

FOOD SERVICES

FOOD SERVICES ON THE NORGOMA INCLUDED

TUCK SHOP WHERE PASSENGERS COULD PURCHASE CANDY, POPCORN, SOFT DRINKS,LOCAL NEWSPAPERS,POST CARDS,STAMPS AND MAGAZINES.

Tuck Shop with shoppers

Passengers visiting the tuck shop

Dining Room Set for A Meal

The well-appointed dining room seated fifty passengers at a time, necessitating two sittings for every meal.

A coloured image of children watching the Norgoma coming to dock.

Children watching for the arrival of the Nogoma and the Captain's Treats

  • The captain would give local children a small amount of money to carry sacks of grain off the boat.
  • The captain would blow the ship's whistle in a salute to the children who gathered at the docks to wave to it.

PASSENGER SERVICES

Passenger service was an important part of the Norgoma's operations

Bonney off on a Norgoma Journey

Passengers would have included loggers, businessmen, travelling salesmen, government officials, as well as families travelling.

Although all the cabins were "first class", a few of them were most luxurious, and had their own bath.

LIFE AS A FREIGHTER/PASSENGER SHIP WAS COMING TO AN END.

 

Even though the Norgoma, the last cruise ship to sail the North Channel, was popular with tourists, by 1960 her days were numbered. Subsidized with government funds, she had outlived her usefulness. The people and ports along the Turkey Trail no longer needed a coastal shipping service. The last run of the S.S. Norgoma (steam ship) on the Turkey Trail from Owen Sound to the Sault took place on September 12, 1963. A total of eighty passengers occupied the Norgoma's staterooms on her final voyage, including a large contingent that had arrived by bus from New York State. Her final cargo was an assignment of fifty-three tons of newsprint for the Owen Sound Sun Times, a newspaper reporter, and two cars. When she finally returned to the docks in Owen Sound, it was the end of an era along the Turkey Trail.

WORKING AS A CAR FERRY

The CPR railroad,new highways and bridges, bus service to the north shore and the rise of the trucking industry had eliminated the need for the steamers services.

Car boarding the Norgoma Ferry

Norgoma working as a Car Ferry

Cars waiting to board the ferry

Waiting to board the Norgoma Ferry

A sign stating "Register your care immediately upon arrival

When purchased by Ontario Northland the Norgoma was renovated to operate as a car ferry between Tobermory and South Baymouth on Manitoulin Island. Her steam engine and boiler were replaced with an 800 horsepower diesel engine, which gave her a service speed of 13.5 knots. One of the stairwells and crew cabins on the main deck were removed to allow her to carry twenty-five cars on the main deck and a dozen on the lower deck. Along with her sister ship, the Norisle, the M.S. Norgoma (motor ship) ran twice daily on the ferry run from Tobermory to South Bay Mouth from 1964 to 1974. When they could no longer keep up with the traffic, they were retired to make way for the Chi-Chee-maun, with a capacity of 140 vehicles.

THE NEED FOR THE NORGOMA DECLINES

After World War II, shipping went into decline on the Upper Great Lakes.

The CPR railroad, improved roads, a car bridge to Manitoulin Island, bus service to the north shore and the rise of the trucking industry eliminated the need for steamer service.

The fishing industry also slowed down in the mid-1900's reducing one important type of return cargo.

While commercial shipping declined, cruise ships traveled along the Turkey Trail until 1967, when the Norgoma quit running.

 

 

It was relocated to Sault Ste. Marie in 1975 and was converted into a floating museum in 1977.

Renovations of the Norgoma

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